Behind the Scenes DVD – or Not?

by Gail Mooney
August 23 2010

In a little more than a week, our 99-day journey trekking around the world shooting this documentary will be over.  Or will it?  My work is really just beginning as I contemplate all we’ve done, people we’ve met and interviewed and how I will put this all together in an edited, finished film.

There are hundreds of ways I can edit this documentary and quite honestly, beginning the process and deciding the direction is always the most difficult.  But there will be a moment when the light bulb goes off and the vision will be clear as to how to make sense of it all.  Then it becomes easy as the story unfolds – as it should from my heart.  It’s the story that can only be told by me and this case, me and my daughter.

My daughter and others have urged me to do a behind-the-scenes DVD

Gail at the Kopila Valley Primary School, Surkhet, Nepal

– she tells me “that’s what people want”,  to know more about the making of the film – more about the people behind the film.  As much as I agree with her and understand this interest on the part of the viewer, there is also a resistance to make myself part of the documentary.  With that said, a separate “behind-the-scenes” chapter could be the solution – to provide more information, without inserting the two of us into the film itself.

One thought does keep popping into my head that motivates me to provide a commentary on the why’s and how’s of this journey and the making of this film. Too many times when I’ve visited museums, I’ve been taken aback by some of the things that I over hear docents talking about in relation to the paintings.  They analyze and interpret what the artist meant by his choice of color, brush stroke and placement of objects within the art and how that related to what was going on in his life at that point in time.  I often wonder how they know that or even how can they be so sure?  Is it documented or is it really just someone’s interpretation that has become fact over the years?

My daughter and I do plan to sit down this week and attempt to do on-camera interviews – while we are still in the moment and before we get back to our normal lives.  Here’s where we need your help – tell us what you want to know.  Maybe you’re curious about how we survived the dynamic of a mother/daughter team for three plus months.  Maybe you want to know why we did this – or how we funded it.  Or maybe the questions are even more basic – what did we like? – what was difficult?– any surprises? etc. etc.  Perhaps you want to know more about the craft of shooting the doc– and how I went about that.  And maybe you don’t really want to know anything at all and just want to know about the subjects of our film.

But please tell me what you’re curious about – as far as the behind-the-scenes making of this film.  All questions are welcome – from the seemingly obvious to the more provocative.

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0 Responses

  1. It’s kind of funny that you even pose the “behind the scenes” question, when this entire blog — the reporting of the trip so far — is essentially all about behind the scenes. So, yes! (as you know), I want behind the scenes, but think it can be a seperate chapter/chapters directly packaged with the “main” movie, or other pieces that take on a life of their own.

    I’ll get back to you with the exact questions about which I want to know. : ))

  2. Tom

    Gail/Erin – I think this is an excellent idea and I applaud you for taking it on while you are still in the moment – in the field. How many times, when experiences and ideas are still vibrant in our minds do we tell ourselves “I’m going to do this or that when I get back” only to get caught-up in the fast lane of our lives back home? Soon the notion fades out of sight or looses its luster with time.

    I would encourage you to do an interview session like this with each other over several days, as more and more memories will be flushed out each time.

    Enjoy the cool, refreshing climate of Buenos Aires as you wind down the production phase, it’s still Summer here! Tom

  3. Lorraine Weeks

    Hello! I have been following your posts since your visit to Kopila Valley, and am awestruck by your undertaking. Would love to see a DVD about your journey and support each of the potential questions you suggest, along with: how did you manage to choose these people to feature in your documentary? Any and all details will be so welcome.

  4. Raeanne

    I would love to know how you chose where to go and who to visit. I’m sure that it was difficult to choose from whom was suggested. I applaud you for opening the eyes to thousands including my own. Safe journey home! Cuidate mucho! Besos

  5. Keith Gemerek

    Hi Gail. I have been travelling with you remotely and it’s been quite a trip! The first question that popped into my mind has to do with relationships you have acquired along the way. Do you have any conscious plans to maintain a connection with anyone you have encountered on this journey? As travelers we always meet people who seem utterly fascinating and wonderful, but parting is inevitable. People like to stay in touch with you and you may share that emotion. Has this occured with you or Erin and how do you plan to stay connected, if you do?

    And, of course, I am interested in how your equipment held up and how your process may have developed along the way. You have shared some of thisk, but I would love to know more. About sound recording especially.

    And then, how did you maintain your health along the way? I find that kind of information valuable. I have done some remote travelling and I know what health perils exist out there, so any advice along these lines from the seasoned travellers is very helpful.

    It sounds like you may have several projects following your travels. I look forward to the results.

    Keith G

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